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ABOUT THIS WEBSITE

The intent of this website is to display projects I am working on for Fortune magazine and other news outlets. I specialize in information graphics, data visualizations and cartography.
I occasionally do freelance work, and you can reach me at nicolasrapp [AT] gmail.com

BOOKS

Click here to see what books you need if you do information graphics, or if you are just interested by design and data visualization.

PORTFOLIO

Click here to see Nick's portfolio

RESUME

Download Nick's resume in PDF
 








  • Finding value in a turbulent world

    Posted on March 4th, 2014 nrapp No comments

    Global markets—particularly emerging ones—have been looking increasingly uncertain of late. But turmoil can mean opportunity. Now that the Fed finally seems committed to winding down its multiyear liquidity binge, how does the world look for investors? The graphic below offers a snapshot of stock market values by country over the past decade. It’s based on the PEG ratio: the price/earnings ratio of a stock divided by the company’s expected profit growth. We applied it to each country’s major stock index. The PEG ratio was the favorite metric of legendary money manager Peter Lynch, who delivered epic returns at Fidelity’s Magellan Fund. It essentially reveals how much investors are paying for growth.

    CLICK TO SEE THE GRAPHIC

    CLICK TO SEE THE FULL SPREAD

     

    When it comes to PEG ratios, a low number—­typically 1 or less—is ideal. After all, you want to pay as little as possible for a stock’s predicted earnings increases. The blue below indicates relative bargains, while red denotes higher priced markets. Negative PEG ratios, which occur when analysts expect profit declines over the next three to five years, are marked in black.

    In the latest issue of Fortune Magazine. Text by Lauren Silva Laughlin.

  • What the MoMA might look like in 2020

    Posted on February 20th, 2014 nrapp No comments

    CLICK TO SEE FULL DIAGRAM

    The next expansion of MoMA follows a familiar path. Is it a step in the wrong direction?
    The Folk Art Museum building, designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, will soon be no more. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), which acquired the building in 2011 and announced in January that the townhouse museum could not be preserved in MoMA’s next expansion, plans to dismantle and store the museum’s weathered façade panels.
    In the latest issue of Architect Magazine.

     

  • Utah’s silicon slopes

    Posted on February 12th, 2014 nrapp No comments

    With a low cost of living and a trove of tech talent streaming out of nearby universities, the 50-mile corridor south of Salt Lake City has become a hotbed of tech activity. The number of tech companies in the state, most of which are clustered in that valley, has jumped 96% to 4,338 over the past decade.

    In the latest issue of Fortune Magazine.

  • The shifting geography of airline hubs

    Posted on December 19th, 2013 nrapp No comments

    CLICK TO SEE FULL GRAPHIC

    A decade ago Dubai’s international airport would have been far smaller on this map—it was the 17th-largest hub for international travelers. Today nearly 60 million passengers move through a year, and a $7.8 billion expansion will see its capacity swell to 90 million by 2018. It will be the largest, most-trafficked international hub in the world. Dubai’s neighbor Abu Dhabi is building a $3 billion terminal, and Doha, in Qatar, is sinking $15.5 billion into its international airport. All told, the region has seen a 13% rise in international passengers since 2002; North America rose just 1.3%.
    In the latest issue of Fortune magazine. Thanks to John O’Sullivan for the flight paths and to ACI World for the stats.

     

  • Of markets and mayhem

    Posted on December 9th, 2013 nrapp No comments

    CLICK TO ENLARGE MAIN GRAPHIC

    Over the past decade or so, trading has become dizzyingly complex and frenetic. An infographic gatefold in the latest issue of Fortune Magazine analyzes high frequency trading data.

    CLICK TO SEE LARGE VERSION

    CLICK TO ENLARGE FULL GATEFOLD

     

  • Mapping the tobacco trade

    Posted on November 25th, 2013 nrapp No comments

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    The U.S. imports far more tobacco than it exports and leads the world in the manufacture and distribution of cigarettes. Where does the leaf go?

  • The Burning Man bump

    Posted on November 4th, 2013 nrapp No comments

    CLICK TO SEE GRAPHIC

    This year upwards of 60,000 revelers (a.k.a. Burners) descended upon Nevada’s Black Rock Desert for a week for the 27th year of the Burning Man festival. Those attendees need supplies to stay hydrated, pitch camp, decorate their cars, and construct the far-out art installations the event is famous for. Burners stock up at Home Depot. They come in droves to the stores in Reno and Carson City and Spanish Springs. Clint Echevarria, Home Depot’s district manager for northern Nevada, has never been to the festival, but it’s on his bucket list. “For two weeks out of the year,” he says, “it’s some of the most exciting times in the aisles.”

    In the latest issue of Fortune Magazine

  • TVA: The largest public power company in the U.S.

    Posted on October 31st, 2013 nrapp No comments

    CLICK TO ENLARGE MAP

    The Tennessee Valley Authority is the largest public power company in the U.S., a vast and sprawling bureaucracy that provides electricity to 9 million Americans in a part of the country where people like their government small, where the words “deeply” and “conservative” go together like “ham and biscuits,” and where the irony of who keeps the lights on is acknowledged with an ambivalent smile. Along with its 29 dams, 11 coal plants, 13 gas-fired stations, and three nuclear power plants, the TVA controls the Tennessee River— all 650 miles, from tip to tail—and manages 11,000 miles of shoreline.